Horse is left behind, survives 6 weeks in Wyoming wilderness

  • In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill and his son Heath from Swift Creek Outfitters stand with their horse, Valentine, after rescuing it from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)

    In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill and his son Heath from Swift Creek Outfitters stand with their horse, Valentine, after rescuing it from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill from Swift Creek Outfitters helps rescue his horse, Valentine, from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)

    In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill from Swift Creek Outfitters helps rescue his horse, Valentine, from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill and his son Heath from Swift Creek Outfitters help rescue their horse, Valentine, from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)

    In this December 2016 photo provided by U.S. Forest Service, B.J. Hill and his son Heath from Swift Creek Outfitters help rescue their horse, Valentine, from a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. The horse was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation. (U.S. Forest Service via AP)  (The Associated Press)

A horse named Valentine was left behind in the Wyoming wilderness by an excursion company after getting sick and survived for six weeks, a case that has raised debate and prompted a criminal investigation.

The domesticated animal had to find food and survive the harsh winter conditions, on top of avoiding grizzly bears.

While the mare is safely back home, her owner is getting angry phone calls from around the country from those he says don’t know the whole story.

Residents in the horse-loving resort region of Jackson Hole are debating whether the company did the right thing in leaving the horse, did all it could to find her or should have put her down to spare her suffering.

The state Board of Livestock is investigating and will forward its review to prosecutors.

One thought on “Horse is left behind, survives 6 weeks in Wyoming wilderness

  1. The people throwing fits because Mr. Hill left one horse behind trying to save the rest, need to just shut up and mind their own business. If Miz Anzelmo really was a horse person, she would understand this. But Mis Anzelmo ISN’T a horse person, she is a horsey person, which is loads different. See, horse people understand that while we love our horses, we understand that they are livestock, and we own them for business as well as pleasure. Horsey people, on the other hand, internalize the belief that horses are people, and treat them as such. Mr. Hill made the tough choice to leave one horse in distress behind in order to save the rest of his string.

    The Mis Anzelmos of the world need to just shut up and mind their own business! They love the ideal of the horse, not the horses themselves. They are the reason that all of the slaughter houses have been shut down and now tens of thousands of horses are crammed into stock trailers, driven thousands of miles without food or water, to end up in Canadian and Mexican slaughter houses. Their religious zealotry in the Cult of the Horse have made the lives of thousands of horses so much worse than they were. These cultists have no sense.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *