USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor closed indefinitely

USS Arizona memorial at Pearl Harbor to be closed INDEFINITELY after engineers discover a crack in the floating structure

Damage to the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu was worse than expected and it will remain closed indefinitely, officials said.

Boat transportation to the attraction was suspended May 6 after one of the vessel operators noticed a crack on the outside of the memorial.

Tourists were allowed to disembark at the memorial after crews completed interim repairs. 

But the cracks reappeared hours later, indicating a more serious issue. 

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Damage to the USS Arizona Memorial (pictured) at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu was worse than expected and it will remain closed indefinitely, officials said

Damage to the USS Arizona Memorial (pictured) at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu was worse than expected and it will remain closed indefinitely, officials said

Tourists were allowed to disembark at the memorial after crews completed interim repairs. But the cracks reappeared hours later, indicating a more serious issue. Pictured are remains from the battleship 

Tourists were allowed to disembark at the memorial after crews completed interim repairs. But the cracks reappeared hours later, indicating a more serious issue. Pictured are remains from the battleship 

Engineers are working to figure out possible long-term solutions. Pictured is the stack of the USS Arizona at the memorial

Engineers are working to figure out possible long-term solutions. Pictured is the stack of the USS Arizona at the memorial

‘There is a brow or an edge where the visitor ramp meets the memorial, and at that point, there’s been some fissures located on the exterior,’ said Jay Blount, a spokesman for the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument.

‘After further investigation on the interior, it was determined that the structure is not supporting the loading ramp the way that we need.’

Engineers are working to figure out possible long-term solutions.

‘The amount of time needed to implement the repairs is unknown, but the (National Park Service) will continue to provide information to the public as our team of specialists works together to restore access as soon as possible,’ memorial staff said Friday in a news release.

During the course of repairs, the free USS Arizona Memorial programs will proceed on schedule. The Pearl Harbor Visitor Center will also remain open.

According to the USS Arizona Memorial Facebook page, visitors will continue to see the 25 minute documentary film followed by a harbor tour of Battleship Row in close proximity to the memorial. 

This photo shows the USS.S.S. Arizona, largest and newest of Uncle Sam's sea fighters passing out to sea under the Brooklyn Bridge on her first voyage since being put in commission.

This photo shows the USS Arizona passing out to sea under the Brooklyn Bridge on her first voyage after being put in commission in 1916

Crowds gathered at the 96th Street Pier to watch the USS Arizona leading the fleet in a naval review for Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, upon the fleet's arrival home at the end of the First World War in New York in December 1918

Crowds gathered at the 96th Street Pier to watch the USS Arizona leading the fleet in a naval review for Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, upon the fleet’s arrival home at the end of the First World War in New York in December 1918

‘The National Park Service (NPS) will provide live or recorded commentary during tours to enhance our visitors’ experience to the greatest extent possible,’ a statement read. 

The news of the memorial’s closure comes just days before Americans across the nation prepare to honor the more than 1.3 million servicemen and women who have died in the United States’ wars.

On December 7, 1941, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the US naval base in Hawaii, plunging America into World War II.

The Japanese assault began around 8am, resulting in the deaths of thousands of Americans, numerous injuries, and the sinking of four battleships, and damage to another four.

Hundreds of Marines and sailors went down with their ships, others were burned beyond recognition in explosions and fires.

The USS Arizona tragically lost 1,177 crewmen out of 1,512 who perished while on the ship during the attack.

On December 7, 1941, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the US naval base in Hawaii, plunging America into World War II. The USS Arizona (pictured) lost 1,177 crewmen out of 1,512 who perished while on the ship during the attack

On December 7, 1941, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the US naval base in Hawaii, plunging America into World War II. The USS Arizona (pictured) lost 1,177 crewmen out of 1,512 who perished while on the ship during the attack

Overall, 2,403 Americans were killed on that day in just 90 minutes. Pictured is the USS Arizona burning after it was bombed

Overall, 2,403 Americans were killed on that day in just 90 minutes. Pictured is the USS Arizona burning after it was bombed

Of the tens of thousands of servicemen who survived, between 2,000 to 2,500 survivors are thought to be still alive. This photo shows the USS Arizona Memorial's listing of fallen servicemen from 1941

Of the tens of thousands of servicemen who survived, between 2,000 to 2,500 survivors are thought to be still alive. This photo shows the USS Arizona Memorial’s listing of fallen servicemen from 1941

Navy fighter planes were blown up without the chance to take off and hangars were set ablaze during the surprise assault.

Of the 402 American aircraft in Hawaii, 188 were destroyed and 159 damaged. 

Almost none were ready to take off to defend the base when the attack started, and just eight managed to get airborne during the attack.

The attack was part of a campaign of Pacific expansion undertaken by Imperial Japan that was intent on carving out an Asian empire to rival those of Europe.

Overall, 2,403 Americans were killed on that day in just 90 minutes.

Of the tens of thousands of servicemen who survived, between 2,000 to 2,500 survivors are thought to be still alive.

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