When tech gets tasty! Mesmerizing video shows a computer crafting an amazing millennial pink cake – which is actually made of 81 different pyramid-shaped pieces

Computers may soon be taking over the world — but luckily, they’re bringing cake.

Pastry chef Dinara Kasko‘s baking techniques require a little higher-tech than an electric mixer. The Ukrainian cake maker bakes cakes and chocolates in incredible sculptural shapes, and for her latest project, she supplemented her recipe with an algorithm.

Using a computer program, Kasko made a giant millennial pink cake filled with mousse, ganache, and berry confit that is mesmerizing the internet.

Eat pink: Pastry chef Dinara Kasko made this incredible pink cake in September using a computer to create the molds for each individual pyramid

Eat pink: Pastry chef Dinara Kasko made this incredible pink cake in September using a computer to create the molds for each individual pyramid

Looks tasty! The inside is filled with Ruby chocolate and meringue mousse, Ruby ganache, a berry confit, and a Ruby biscuit with raspberries.

Looks tasty! The inside is filled with Ruby chocolate and meringue mousse, Ruby ganache, a berry confit, and a Ruby biscuit with raspberries.

Masterpiece: She was asked by Barry Callebaut, the makers of a new naturally-pink chocolate called Ruby, to make the cake for the debut

Masterpiece: She was asked by Barry Callebaut, the makers of a new naturally-pink chocolate called Ruby, to make the cake for the debut

Pieces in a puzzle: Though it is presented as one cake it is actually made of 81 smaller cakes

Pieces in a puzzle: Though it is presented as one cake it is actually made of 81 smaller cakes

Earlier this year, the Swiss chocolate company Barry Callebaut debuted a new confection: a naturally pink chocolate called ‘Ruby’. Made with ruby cocoa beans, Daily Mail Online found the the sweet has a fruity, sour taste.

As part of a debut of the product in Shanghai in September, Barry Callebaut enlisted Kasko to bake something special with the Ruby chocolate.

And she certainly delivered. Using a graphical algorithm editor called Grasshopper, she programmed her computer to make 81 small molds for her cake — which would later be assembled into one giant geometric dessert.

‘The idea was to create a set of elements (cakes) that together would form a single composition,’ she wrote on her website. ‘As a result, we got [an] algorithmically modeled cake that consisted of 81 individual cakes, every single was unique in shape.’

Technical stuff: She used a graphical algorithm editor called Grasshopper to design it

Technical stuff: She used a graphical algorithm editor called Grasshopper to design it

From screen to plate: She adjust the algorithm to create the tilted, twisted design

From screen to plate: She adjust the algorithm to create the tilted, twisted design

Step by step: The model was printed out and poured into silicone

Step by step: The model was printed out and poured into silicone

Nom nom: The cake was baked in the silicone and then covered in the Ruby chocolate

Nom nom: The cake was baked in the silicone and then covered in the Ruby chocolate

Too pretty too eat! The pieces were then arranged together in an incredible design

Too pretty too eat! The pieces were then arranged together in an incredible design

'It was a very risky project,' she admitted, 'but it worked well and everything turned out great'

‘It was a very risky project,’ she admitted, ‘but it worked well and everything turned out great’

Each individual cake is a slightly different shape. They are all pyramids, but they tilt and lean at different angles. When places together, they make a mesmerizing, twisting, turning sheet cake.

‘It was a very risky project,’ she admitted, ‘but it worked well and everything turned out great at the presentation.’

A video Kasko created shows the algorithm being made. The model was then printed and poured into silicone to make molds.

The cakes were all baked into the molds so they’d be the correct sizes and shapes. She came up with a unique recipe for the occasion, filling each piece with Ruby chocolate and meringue mousse, Ruby ganache, a berry confit, and a Ruby biscuit with raspberries.

'The idea was to create a set of elements (cakes) that together would form a single composition,' she added

‘The idea was to create a set of elements (cakes) that together would form a single composition,’ she added

Eat up: She picked fruit for the inside to complement the taste of the chocolate 

Eat up: She picked fruit for the inside to complement the taste of the chocolate 

Chocolate on chocolate: The Ruby chocolate was use for both the outside and the fillings

Chocolate on chocolate: The Ruby chocolate was use for both the outside and the fillings

Ta da! She showed her cake at a presentation in ShanghaiSomethin

Ta da! She showed her cake at a presentation in Shanghai

Something different: The chocolate is made from ruby cocoa beans and tastes fruity and both sour and sweet

Something different: The chocolate is made from ruby cocoa beans and tastes fruity and both sour and sweet

Each piece was then covered in Ruby chocolate, hardened, and popped out to be put together in time for the presentation in China.

When the pink chocolate debuted last month, Chief Executive Officer Antoine de Saint-Affrique told Bloomberg: ‘It’s natural, it’s colorful, it’s hedonistic, there’s an indulgence aspect to it, but it keeps the authenticity of chocolate. It has a nice balance that speaks a lot to millennials.’

The ruby cocoa beans come from Ivory Coast, Ecuador, and Brazil and are naturally reddish, without dye.

Kasko was one of the first to get to try the creation so she could use it in her cake.

‘I was honored to be one of the first who could try the new pink chocolate, work with it, to represent the company at a major event and work together with these talented chefs,’ she wrote on Instagram.

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