Alabama reporter is told to LEAVE execution after officials complained that her skirt was too SHORT

Alabama reporter is told to LEAVE execution chamber viewing room after officials complained that her skirt was too SHORT and her open toe shoes were too revealing

<!–<!–<!–<!–<!–<!–<!–

An Alabama reporter was forced to change her outfit while attending an execution after a member of staff at the Alabama Department of Corrections said her skirt was too short.

Ivana Hrynkiw Shatara had been set to attend the execution of Joe Nathan James Jr, in Atmore, Alabama, on July 28, when she was told her outfit was inappropriate.

James, 50, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 1994 shooting death of his former girlfriend, Faith Hall, 26.

The reporter, from AL.com, claims that she had worn the skirt on more than one occasion to executions at William C. Holman Correctional Facility with no issues.

After she was forced to change into a fellow member of the press’ waders, the official at the Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) reportedly told her that her ‘open toe heels’ were also inappropriate.

Shatara then had to run to her car and put on tennis shoes, before being allowed back in to continue to do her job.

A reporter from CBS initially tweeted about the incident, before Shatara chose to share her experience online.

In a statement posted to her social media she said: ‘I was not going to share this story but after another member of the media called attention to it, I want to get the story out there.

Ivana Hrynkiw Shatara, pictured not in the outfit she was wearing, was ordered to change her clothes while attending an execution as a reporter. She was told by officials that her skirt was ‘too short’ and her open toe heels were ‘inappropriate’

Rules at the Alabama Department of Corrections state that all dresses, skirts and pants should extend below the knee. However it does not state anything about shorts for men, and if this applies to those visiting while working in the prison

Rules at the Alabama Department of Corrections state that all dresses, skirts and pants should extend below the knee. However it does not state anything about shorts for men, and if this applies to those visiting while working in the prison 

Shatara had been set to attend the execution of Joe Nathan James Jr at the prison in Alabama on July 28, when she was told her outfit was inappropriate

Shatara had been set to attend the execution of Joe Nathan James Jr at the prison in Alabama on July 28, when she was told her outfit was inappropriate

‘Tonight a representative of the Alabama Department of Corrections told me publicly I couldn’t view the execution because my skirt was too short.

‘I have worn this skirt to prior executions without incident, to work, professional events and more and I believe it is more than appropriate.

‘At 5’7 and 5’10 with my heels on I am a tall and long-legged person. I tried to pull my skirt to my hips to make the skirt longer but was told it was still not appropriate.

‘Luckily a very kind photographer from a Birmingham TV station offered me his rain gear – waterproof, Colombia PFG style fisherman’s wader pants.

‘The ADOC spokesperson deemed this an appropriate swap for my skirt. I put on the man’s pants and attached the suspenders underneath my shirt to stay up.

‘Then I was told my shoes (open toe heels) were also too revealing and I needed to change shoes.

‘Thankfully I had a new pair of tennis shoes in my car. Despite wearing a pair of waders from a man I have never met and casual tennis shoes, I continued to do my job.

‘This was an uncomfortable situation and I felt embarrassed to have my body and my clothes questioned in front of a room of people I mostly had never met.

The reporter went on to say that she continued to do her job, and 'tried to stop blushing' over the incident. She went on to say that women 'often have' to just get on with it in similar situations

The reporter went on to say that she continued to do her job, and ‘tried to stop blushing’ over the incident. She went on to say that women ‘often have’ to just get on with it in similar situations

The reporter posted about the incident on social media after another journalist from CBS made reference to it. She said that she felt 'uncomfortable' and 'embarrassed' in the situation

The reporter posted about the incident on social media after another journalist from CBS made reference to it. She said that she felt ‘uncomfortable’ and ’embarrassed’ in the situation 

‘I sat down, tried to stop blushing, and did my work. As women often have to do. If you read this far, you get a medal. Thank you for your support!’

In rules for visitors to the ADOC, published in 2022, they require that ‘all dresses, skirts, and pants shall extend below the knee (females only). Splits/Slits must be knee length or lower (females only).’

However, it is unclear if this ruling applies to those visiting in a working capacity, or just those who are visiting an inmate.

Her post, which has nearly 10,000 liked and thousands of retweets, saw other reporters come out in support of her.

Kaitlyn Ross, a reporter at 11Alive in Atlanta, Georgia, said: ‘I have also been denied entry into a government facility to report on a court case because my professional clothing was deemed “too revealing.”

‘It’s exhausting to be a woman. You did a great job under ridiculous circumstances. I’m sorry this happened.’

Dana Hall McCain, who also works at AL.com added: ‘That whole thing was ridiculous, and I’m sorry you had to go through it. 

Joe Nathan James Jr was executed by lethal injection after the US Supreme Court denied his request for a stay. His victim's daughters begged for him to serve life in prison instead after shooting their mother three times in 1994

Joe Nathan James Jr was executed by lethal injection after the US Supreme Court denied his request for a stay. His victim’s daughters begged for him to serve life in prison instead after shooting their mother three times in 1994

Other reporters have backed up the AL.com journalist, saying that she did a 'great job' under the circumstances. They also claimed that it was a 'sexist power move' from the ADOC

Other reporters have backed up the AL.com journalist, saying that she did a ‘great job’ under the circumstances. They also claimed that it was a ‘sexist power move’ from the ADOC

‘Thank you for pushing through and doing your job despite it all.’

Beth Shelburne said: ‘Arbitrary & clearly a sexist power move from ADOC. Sorry you had to experience it, but glad you persevered (in wader pants!) KUDOS to you.’

The Alabama Department of Corrections and Shatara did not immediately respond to DailyMail.com’s request for comment.

Joe Nathan James Jr, was executed by lethal injection after the US Supreme Court denied his request for a stay. 

Alabama Gov Kay Ivey announced that she would allow the execution to proceed after his victim’s daughters begged for him to serve life in prison instead. 

Prosecutors claim that James briefly dated Faith Hall and became obsessed after she rejected him, stalking her for months before he shot her three times.

On August 15, 1994, James forced his way inside her friends apartment before pulling a gun from his waistband and shooting her. 

Hall’s two daughters, Toni Hall Melton, and Terryln Hall, were three and six when their mother was killed, did not attend the execution.

They had previously said they would rather James serve life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Advertisement