Chicago prosecutor blasts Kim Foxx in resignation letter, can’t work for office ‘I don’t respect’

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An Illinois prosecutor took Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx to task in a scathing, office-wide resignation letter, saying her office cares more about political narratives than crime victims.

Assistant Cook County State’s Attorney Jim Murphy said he “can’t continue to work for an administration I don’t respect,” in his letter resigning his position after 25 years of service. His last day was Friday, according to a copy of the letter obtained by Fox News. 

“I wish I could stay,” he wrote. “However, I can no longer work for this Administration. I have zero confidence in leadership.”

Fox News has reached out to Foxx’s office but has not received a response. 

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Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx. An attorney in her officer issued a scathing resignation letter Friday blasting Foxx and her policies. 

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx. An attorney in her officer issued a scathing resignation letter Friday blasting Foxx and her policies.  (Cook County State’s Attorney)

Murphy cited a number of reasons for his departure, including the “Safe-T Act,” a measure that requires prosecutors to present a higher burden of proof to hold accused criminals until trial. 

While Murphy said he supports eliminating cash-bail, he said Foxx’s office rushed the reform and that his concerns were brushed aside. Murphy also cited “dangerously” low staffing levels in all units and bureaus in Foxx’s office, to the point where one or two-person courtrooms are now common. 

“If this administration was truly concerned with effectively fighting violent crime, then they would fully staff those courtrooms and units,” he wrote. “Meanwhile the rest of us are overworked, overstressed, and under-resourced. But at least we were allowed to wear jeans in July.”

Murphy said Foxx was angry one day several months ago when he was summoned into a meeting about bond hearings he was involved in. One involved a “massive shootout” and the other a woman who was gunned down walking to a store after being caught in the crossfire. 

Murphy said Foxx was upset about a newspaper headline that indicated the suspect would not face a murder charge under the Safe-T Act. He said Foxx appeared to be more upset with the headline than the fact that a woman had died. 

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“That is what is wrong with this administration. I’ve seen day after day,” he said. “How many mass shootings do there have to be before something is done.” 

“This administration is more concerned with political narratives and agendas than with victims and prosecuting violent crime,” he added. “That is why I can’t stay any longer.”