City of Uvalde working to ‘cover up’ police records from shooting: Report

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The city of Uvalde is seeking to evade records requests from multiple outlets regarding the police response to last month’s shooting at Robb Elementary School, the Daily Mail reported Monday.

Uvalde police are facing heavy scrutiny into their response to the shooting, which left 19 children and two teachers dead. Police stood for nearly an hour outside the pair of classrooms where 18-year-old Salvador Ramos carried out his rampage.

The city reacted to records requests by retaining lawyers and sending a letter to Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, laying out arguments against fulfilling the requests.

“The City claims that the requested information is not information that is collected, assembled, or maintained under a law or ordinance or in connection with the transaction of official business by a governmental body or for a governmental body or is excepted from disclosure,” attorney Cynthia Trevino wrote, according to the Mail.

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Uvalde School Police Chief Pete Arredondo, third from left, stands during a news conference outside of the Robb Elementary school in Uvalde, Texas Thursday, May 26, 2022. 

Uvalde School Police Chief Pete Arredondo, third from left, stands during a news conference outside of the Robb Elementary school in Uvalde, Texas Thursday, May 26, 2022.  ((AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills))

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The lawyers requested a determination from Paxton on whether they were exempt from releasing the information.

Much of the scrutiny has fallen on Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Department Chief Pete Arredondo, who didn’t have his police radio with him while responding to the shooting.

Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw said during a June 3 press conference that Arredondo had misidentified the situation when he arrived to the school.

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“The on-scene commander considered a barricaded subject and that there was time and there were no children at risk. Obviously, you know, based on the information we have, there were children in that classroom that were at risk, and it was, in fact, still an active shooter situation and not a barricaded subject,” McCraw said at the time.