Data of 134,000 Navy personnel is at risk after hackers break in to a contractor’s laptop

The data of 134,000 Navy personnel is at risk after hackers broke into a contractor’s laptop.

Hackers gained access to sensitive information, including the names and social security numbers of 134,386 current and former sailors.

A laptop used by a Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services employee working on a US Navy contract was ‘compromised’, the force said in a statement.

Hewlett Packard told the Navy of the breach on October 27 and the affected sailors will be notified in the coming weeks. 

Hackers gained access to sensitive information, including the names and social security numbers of 134,386 current and former sailors

Hackers gained access to sensitive information, including the names and social security numbers of 134,386 current and former sailors

‘The Navy takes this incident extremely seriously – this is a matter of trust for our sailors,’ Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Admiral Robert Burke said.

Burke said the probe into the breach was in its early stages. 

‘At this stage of the investigation, there is no evidence to suggest misuse of the information that was compromised,’ the Navy added.

A Navy official close to the investigation said the personal data came from the Career Waypoints database – known as C-WAY – which sailors use to submit re-enlistment and Navy Occupational Specialty requests.   

This is the second major breach of Navy data linked to its contracting activities with Hewlett Packard.

In 2013 the service announced Iran had penetrated its unclassified Navy and Marine Corps Intranet. 

In March 2014, it was found the breach was because of a sloppily written contract with Hewlett Packard that didn’t require HP to provide security for some of the Navy’s unclassified databases.

Hillary Clinton and US officials had blamed Russian hackers for stealing more than 19,000 emails from Democratic party officials during the bitter election campaign 

Hillary Clinton and US officials had blamed Russian hackers for stealing more than 19,000 emails from Democratic party officials during the bitter election campaign 

The latest hack also comes after the US government accused Russia of hacking the Democratic party’s computer networks and claimed Moscow was attempting to ‘interfere’ with the US presidential election.

Hillary Clinton and US officials had blamed Russian hackers for stealing more than 19,000 emails from Democratic party officials. 

The FBI also began an investigation into allegations Russians had hacked the private email of John Podesta, her campaign chairman, which were published by WikiLeaks. 

Vladimir Putin – praised by Donald Trump during the bitter campaign – strenuously denied Russia ever being engaged in cyber attacks to influence the election. 

It was announced yesterday US activists had called for a recount in battleground states where Trump defeated Clinton amid fears the ballot was influenced by hackers.

If the three states of Wisconsin, Illinois and Pennsylvania were overturned it would theoretically hand the White House to Clinton.   

Data experts have questioned why Clinton performed worse in counties that relied on electronic voting machines compared to paper ballots and optical scanners.