December 7, 2022

close Bill to make daylight saving time bill permanent stalls in House Video

Bill to make daylight saving time bill permanent stalls in House

Fox News congressional correspondent Chad Pergram gives a rundown of the congressional daylight saving time bill and the intricacy of time itself.

Daylight Saving Time 2022 will end this weekend.

Millions of Americans are anticipating the national clock adjustment, which will go into effect on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, and will run until Sunday, March 13, 2023.

In preparation for the time shift, Fox News Digital looked into the history of Daylight Saving Time in the U.S.

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Here are 10 little-known facts about Daylight Saving Time.

Daylight Saving Time during the fall is the time when millions turn back the clock.

Daylight Saving Time during the fall is the time when millions turn back the clock.
(iStock)

3rd month, 11th month – Daylight Saving Time starts in March (spring) and ends in November (fall).

The spring Daylight Saving Time adds an hour, so “there is one less hour in the day” — while the fall Daylight Saving Time subtracts an hour, so “there is an extra hour in the day,” according to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.

2nd Sunday at hour 2 – The two dates for Daylight Saving Time change each year because they are implemented on the second Sunday of March and the second Sunday of November.

Daylight Saving Time happens at 2 a.m. each time, according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

For spring Daylight Saving Time, clocks jump forward to 3 a.m. once it strikes 2 a.m. local time, which skips 2 a.m. altogether.

Millions of Americans doublecheck their clocks and watches whenever Daylight Saving Time happens.

Millions of Americans doublecheck their clocks and watches whenever Daylight Saving Time happens.
(iStock)

For fall Daylight Saving Time, the opposite happens, and clocks jump backward to 1 a.m. once it strikes 2 a.m. local time, so the hour is repeated before it moves in chronological order again.

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1916 – The first instance of Daylight Saving Time happened in Germany on April 6, 1916, during World War I, according to the Textual Records Division of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

In a blog post, the Textual Records Division reported that the German Bundesrat’s Federal Council passed an order that instructed citizens to change their clocks by adding “an hour of daylight to the day during the months of May through September.”

1918 – Congress passed the Standard Time Act of 1918, according to a Daylight Saving Time article published by the U.S. House of Representatives’ History, Art & Archives website.

The Standard Time Act of 1918 was the country’s first nationwide daylight-saving law.

“The act, which built off an earlier campaign by railroad companies to synchronize their schedules in North America, established five time zones across the continental United States and Alaska and, importantly, mandated that clocks be advanced one hour on the last Sunday in March and set back one hour on the last Sunday in October,” the History, Art & Archives wrote in its report.

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1966 – The Uniform Time Act of 1966 was signed into law on April 13, 1966, by President Lyndon B. Johnson, according to the U.S. House of Representatives’ History, Art & Archives.

“Although the law would be amended several times in the coming decades, the Uniform Time Act of 1966 remains a major foundation of our system of timekeeping,” the History, Art & Archives wrote.

71 – Only 71 countries observe Daylight Saving Time, according to Time and Date, a Norwegian-owned time zone and global clock website.

View of planet Earth from the moon's surface. Elements of this image are furnished by NASA.

View of planet Earth from the moon’s surface. Elements of this image are furnished by NASA.
(iStock)

Daylight Saving Time is reportedly still used in eight countries in North America, two countries in South America, seven countries in Asia, two countries in Africa, three countries in Oceania (Australia and the Pacific Islands) and 49 countries in Europe.

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2 states, 5 territories – Daylight Saving Time is not observed in Hawaii, Arizona (with exception to the Navajo Nation), American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures – a nonpartisan organization made up of sitting state legislators in Washington, D.C.

4th month, 10th month – In the U.S., Daylight Saving Time used to be observed in April and October, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Daylight Saving Time was moved to November and March with the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which addressed energy production in the U.S.

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6 in 10 Americans – A Daylight Saving Time survey published by Monmouth University – a private college in West Long Branch, New Jersey – in March 2022, found that 61% of Americans would like to get rid of “the nation’s twice-a-year time change.”

The U.S. states that want year-round DST

    – Pacific: Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada

    – Mountain: Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico

    – Central: Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama

    – Eastern: Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida

29 states – Between 2015 and 2019, 29 states have introduced legislation for year-round Daylight Saving Time, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

The 29 states that would like to have Daylight Saving Time year-round are seeking to “abolish the twice-yearly switching of clocks,” according to the transportation agency.

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The Department of Transportation is the government agency that has the “authority” to change Daylight Saving Time and it’s “a power it has held since its foundation in 1966,” the statistics bureau wrote.