Former firefighter who doesn’t identify as a man OR woman now poses for both male AND female campaigns – and insists that her body ‘does not define her’

A former firefighter is taking the modelling world by storm, working for the likes of Elle, Vogue and Calvin Klein – as both a man and a woman. 

Rain Dove, 27, from New York is a self proclaimed ‘gender capitalist’, which means she takes advantage of the opportunities she’s given based on whatever sex people perceive her to be.

Standing at 6ft 2in tall, with chiseled cheek bones, broad shoulders, muscular arms and size 32DD breasts, Rain dresses in either male or female clothing depending on how she feels that day.

‘I’m not gender fluid, I’m not gender non conforming, I’m not gender free,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘I believe that if you want gender then you can have it. If you want to label yourself then sure. If you want to use history to describe who you are then there is nothing wrong with that. But don’t limit me on the way that you limit yourself. I am “I”. That is it. I’m not my body.’ 

Rain is currently starring in Illamasqua’s Gender Fluid Christmas Campaign and recently delivered a talk at the DIVA Literary Festival and Awards in Birmingham, but her success hasn’t come overnight.  

Rain Dove, 27, is a model and activist who believes that people be themselves and not feel put into boxes by society 

Rain Dove, 27, is a model and activist who believes that people be themselves and not feel put into boxes by society 

Rain grew up in a small town farming down in Vermont, she explained that she was off the grid and didn’t watch television. 

So when class mates began to call her her ‘Tranny Danny’ she thought that the word tranny meant someone that liked trains.

She even got her mum to buy her a train conductor cap and wore it to school for the next three years. ‘People would smile as they greeted me with ‘Tranny Danny’ and I thought I was cool, no one else had a cool nickname.

‘Then when I was in 6th grade I found out what a tranny meant and I realised I’d been made fun of by all my peers for years. My reputation was that I had bad BO and I was poor, and I was ugly.’

She poses in both men's and women's clothing and shares them on Instagram with statements or quotes in the captions 

She poses in both men’s and women’s clothing and shares them on Instagram with statements or quotes in the captions 

But in that moment I realised that if I gave them I didn’t give power to them they wouldn’t have power over me.’ 

Rain explained that whilst she went through a dark time growing up, she is appreciative of her struggles.

She said: ‘In order for a book to be interesting the character has to go through some kind of conflict. I realised that not a lot of people get the privilege of having a good story. 

‘But I knew I was destined to have a good story, and maybe I’m not meant to be the girl next door, maybe I’m not meant to meet the guy who sweeps her off her feet, takes her to prom. Maybe due to my aesthetics I’m due to be the girl who survives the apocalypse instead.’

After school Rain became a local firefighter and on her first day all of her colleagues just assumed she was a man. She recalled: ‘After introducing myself I realised that they thought I was a dude.

She always thought that she was the ugly girl growing up, but it turns out she wasn't ugly, she just looked more manly than most girls 

She always thought that she was the ugly girl growing up, but it turns out she wasn’t ugly, she just looked more manly than most girls 

Her hashtag is 'educate don't hate' and she strongly believes on talking to those who disagree with her lifestyle as she believes that they need the most help

Her hashtag is ‘educate don’t hate’ and she strongly believes on talking to those who disagree with her lifestyle as she believes that they need the most help

Rain feels that it's part of her job to talk to those who don't agree or understand her views on gender. She says that she often gets death threats but sees them as an opportunity to educate

Rain feels that it’s part of her job to talk to those who don’t agree or understand her views on gender. She says that she often gets death threats but sees them as an opportunity to educate

‘But I thought this was great. I didn’t have to be perceived as the ugly girl anymore. I’d done it my whole life and I was tired of it.’

Thinking it would be fun to keep it up for an hour or so, Rain explained that an hour became a week, a week became a month and a month became a year – it got to the point where it was impossible to come clean.

Discovering who she was it took some time. She first came out as a lesbian, then she was gender fluid, then she was gender non conforming and now she has evolved to gender capitalist.

She explained that her supporters are often her harshest critics and she had to be careful that she wasn’t offending any communities with her identity.  

‘I love my body. It’s awesome, it’s my vessel and I don’t plan on changing it.  So I took myself of social media and after a lot of thought I realised that what I’m trying to say is ‘I am I’ that’s it. 

She stumbled onto her modelling career by accident after losing a bet with her friend that resulted in having to go to a casting for men's underwear campaign for Calvin Klein

She stumbled onto her modelling career by accident after losing a bet with her friend that resulted in having to go to a casting for men’s underwear campaign for Calvin Klein

While pursuing a degree in genetic engineering, Rain fell into the world of modelling by mistake. After losing a bet with a friend she ended up having to go to a casting call for Calvin Klein which turned out to be for men’s underwear.

She got the job and decided to walk the runway topless, and from there her modelling career took off.  

Her success has lead to her gaining over 165,000 followers on Instagram, but despite the love she receives, she accepts that not everyone will be approving of her lifestyle.

‘I have people who hate me, to the point where they actually want me to die. But I want my platform to be an invitation to everybody. I want to talk to these people, I want to hear their fears and I want to address them because everyone’s fears come from a moderately valid place.’

Rain tackles feminist issues, like shaving legs, as well as the expectations that are put on men

Rain tackles feminist issues, like shaving legs, as well as the expectations that are put on men

Rain explains that she wears what she wants to wear depending on what she wants to get out of a day 

Rain explains that she wears what she wants to wear depending on what she wants to get out of a day 

‘I have the privilege because the queer community have come together to support me, so by clicking the like button on my Instagram they’ve endorsed me. With their support it’s given me a career and I would be doing a disservice to them if I didn’t put myself in the line of fire and dealing with the haters.’ 

‘Social media is a safe space, it’s a space where you can attend without a body, without a sexuality, without a body, without anything other than your intentions and your follow through. 

‘You’re basically just words and a profile picture that could be you, it could be a cat, or it could be a plate of spaghetti. It’s the closest thing to being the ‘us that is us’.’ 

Rain often poses on her social media in both men’s and women’s clothes, to point out the stark differences, and the differences in how she feels or is treated. She says that she wears what she wants, and it depends on how she is feeling that day or what she wants to get out of the day – comparing her wardrobe to a tool box. 

She says: ‘We didn’t choose our gender, we are being punished for it. No matter who you are, you’re punished for it. You’re so out of control of our lives because society controls what we can and can’t do. 

‘We have to enjoy life and live right now, don’t let people limit your s***, because you may never have this s*** again.’