More than 70 million people are under heat warnings this weekend

More than 70 million Americans are under heat warnings this weekend as the mercury hits records in Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver and Death Valley

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More than 70 million of Americans are under heat alerts after Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver and California‘s Death Valley all posted record temperatures on Saturday, as dangerous and ‘potentially deadly’ heat sweeps across the American Southwest to the Gulf Coast.

The National Weather Service in Phoenix reported a temperature of 114F (46C) on Saturday, tying the record high for the date set back in 1918.

‘Extreme and deadly heat will continue through this weekend,’ the National Weather Service in Phoenix said. 

Las Vegas tied a record for the day set in 1956, with temperatures soaring to 109F (43 C) on Saturday. The National Weather Service (NWS) said there was a chance the high temperatures in both cities could rise even more over the next week. 

Denver, Colorado, hit 100F (38C) on Saturday, tying a record set in 2013 for both the high temperature and the earliest calendar day to reach 100F (38C). High heat is expected to remain in the area until Tuesday, where conditions will drop to mid-80s Fahrenheit (26C). 

Several states across the US have observed a surge in temperature as a heat wave settles in. Cities such as Las Vegas, Phoenix and Denver observed record-highs in June over the last week while the Death Valley in California has also observed scorching temperatures. More heat is expected in areas between the Ohio Valley and the Gulf Coast this week

Several states across the US have observed a surge in temperature as a heat wave settles in. Cities such as Las Vegas, Phoenix and Denver observed record-highs in June over the last week while the Death Valley in California has also observed scorching temperatures. More heat is expected in areas between the Ohio Valley and the Gulf Coast this week

Forecasters are warning of dangerously high temperatures in much of southwest of the US, in Arizona, the interior of southern California and the Death Valley as high heat grips the region. Pictured: A woman relaxing in the cooling water of the American River as the temperature climbed over 100F in Sacramento, California

Forecasters are warning of dangerously high temperatures in much of southwest of the US, in Arizona, the interior of southern California and the Death Valley as high heat grips the region. Pictured: A woman relaxing in the cooling water of the American River as the temperature climbed over 100F in Sacramento, California

Excessive heat, as witnessed lately in Phoenix, Arizona, causes more deaths in the U.S. than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined. Pictured: A pair of mid-day hikers pose for a picture in the hole in the rock at Papago Park on Friday in Phoenix

Excessive heat, as witnessed lately in Phoenix, Arizona, causes more deaths in the U.S. than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined. Pictured: A pair of mid-day hikers pose for a picture in the hole in the rock at Papago Park on Friday in Phoenix

Temperatures in several inland areas of southeastern California reached triple digits on Saturday afternoon, with a record high for June 11 of 122F (50C) reached in Death Valley.

Excessive heat warnings and heat advisories were also issued for parts of Northern California through the Central Valley and down to the southeastern deserts.

The National Weather Service also predicted 114F (46C) in Palm Springs and temperatures around 100F (38C) across the San Joaquin Valley and the Sacramento area.

Heat was expected to extend to inland portions of the San Francisco Bay Area but most of the California coastal zones remained free of heat advisories. 

Heat advisories in parts of Southern California were extended through Sunday and may go well until next Saturday, the National Weather Service has warned.

Parts of the Ohio Valley, south and The Death Valley have seen temperatures soar as a heat wave settles in several parts of the country

Parts of the Ohio Valley, south and The Death Valley have seen temperatures soar as a heat wave settles in several parts of the country

The National Weather Service said last week that Phoenix had 113F (45C) weather, just one degree short of the record set back in 1918

The National Weather Service said last week that Phoenix had 113F (45C) weather, just one degree short of the record set back in 1918

States including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California have been issued excessive heat advisories due to temperatures reaching three digits within the last week

States including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California have been issued excessive heat advisories due to temperatures reaching three digits within the last week

San Francisco has maintained its warm, chilly weather even though more inland places not too far away from the Bay Area have soared past 100F (38C)

San Francisco has maintained its warm, chilly weather even though more inland places not too far away from the Bay Area have soared past 100F (38C)

Meteorologists warned of very high ‘heat risk’ in south-central Arizona through the weekend. The high temperatures were likely to approach record-breaking territory — anywhere between 110F (43C) and 115F (46C). 

They have urged the public to limit outdoor activities.

Parts of New Mexico and Texas also saw temperatures reaching triple-digits (high 30s to early 40s in Celsius) over the weekend, which is likely to extend for most of the upcoming week. 

Albuquerque saw a record-high 100F (38C) on Friday and will be flirting in the high 90s for the rest of the week. 

Phoenix could observe temperatures reaching 110F (43C) on Sunday while cities such as San Antonio, Houston, Dallas and Austin will also be in triple digits. Some parts of Nebraska are also expected to reach 100 to 105F (37-to-40C). 

Next week, the Ohio Valley and central US will see temperatures rise to 100F (38C), to possibly 105F (40C). Pictured: A National Weather Service warning for the area of North Platte, Nebraska

Next week, the Ohio Valley and central US will see temperatures rise to 100F (38C), to possibly 105F (40C). Pictured: A National Weather Service warning for the area of North Platte, Nebraska 

On Thursday, weather in Phoenix could reach 113F (45C), just nine degrees cooler than the hottest temperature recorded in the area – 122F (50C) in 1990, according to AZ Family.

The Ohio Valley is also seeing temperatures climb 20 to 30 degrees higher than usual and pass 90F later this week following severe thunderstorms.

Monday will see highs from at least 95 to 100F (35-to-38C) across Columbus, Charleston and Indianapolis while St Louis and and Kansas City could also reach 100F (38C). 

These same conditions are expected to last until Wednesday in the area as well as much of the Midwest. 

 

St Louis is one of the cities in the Valley that will see temperatures go nearly up to 110F this week (43C)

St Louis is one of the cities in the Valley that will see temperatures go nearly up to 110F this week (43C)

Heat is part of the normal routine of summertime in the desert, but weather forecasters say that doesn’t mean people should feel at ease. 

Excessive heat causes more deaths in the U.S. than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined.

Meteorologists advise people in these affected areas to drink more water than usual and to limit outdoor activity during peak hours of the heat, wherever they may be.

Wearing protection, including hats, sunscreen and sunglasses, is also advised. It’s not recommended to wear dark clothes as black clothing often transmits heat to the skin, making a person hotter. 

Scientists say more frequent and intense heat waves are likely in the future because of climate change and a deepening drought.

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