NYC dog trapped in hot car endures month-long recovery, finds home with police officer

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A dog that had been trapped inside a hot car this summer in New York City for as long as 24 hours now has a new home — thanks to the police officers who rescued him from the dire situation and the officer who then took him into her heart.

An official from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) told Fox News Digital that New York City Police Department officers rescued the fluffy white dog — an American Eskimo dog whose name is now Snow — and brought him to the ASPCA Animal Recovery Center on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. 

There, the dog was given medical care and behavioral treatment until he was ready for adoption. 

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Last month, the NYPD tweeted about the rescue as it was happening. It said police responded to calls from “caring New Yorkers” who notified them about a dog locked in a hot car in the heat of the summer. 

The responding police officers discovered the car was off, the windows were closed and the distressed dog was inside, according to the NYPD 19th Precinct’s tweet.

Police tweeted that the dog was locked inside the car for two hours; the ASPCA confirmed afterward that the dog was trapped inside the car for at least 24 hours.

The officers broke through one of the car’s windows, removed the suffering pup from the car once they were able to open the door — and brought the animal to the ASPCA for treatment. 

A criminal investigation was underway at that time, according to the June 18 social media post.

On an 85-degree day, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of a car to reach a deadly 102 degrees, the NYPD said. 

Another tweet shared by the NYPD 19th Precinct said the temperatures that hot summer June day were in the mid-80s.

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The precinct said that on an 85-degree day, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of a car to reach a deadly 102 degrees. 

This sweet dog — an American Eskimo dog — was trapped in a hot car in Manhattan for approximately 24 hours. It took the dog a month to recover and to be available for adoption.

This sweet dog — an American Eskimo dog — was trapped in a hot car in Manhattan for approximately 24 hours. It took the dog a month to recover and to be available for adoption. (ASPCA)

The NYPD social media post also said the law prohibits leaving “an animal unattended in a car under these dangerous conditions — thankfully the pup was rescued & is being cared for.”

Officer Aruna Maharaj, one of the NYPD rescuers, remained in touch with the ASPCA during Snow’s month-long recovery, a media spokesperson for the ASPCA told Fox News Digital.

This dog — rescued from a hot car — has now been adopted. The dog's new name is Snow. The officer who adopted the pet "knew Snow was special."

This dog — rescued from a hot car — has now been adopted. The dog’s new name is Snow. The officer who adopted the pet "knew Snow was special." (ASPCA)

The ASPCA also confirmed that the officer and her fiancé made the adoption official just last week.  

“From the moment Officer Maharaj was involved in this case, she knew Snow was special,” the ASPCA official told Fox Digital News.

“When [the officer] rescued Snow from the car, she instantly fell in love.”

The spokesperson said that the officer was not looking to adopt a pet — but when she rescued Snow from the car, she instantly fell in love. 

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“She immediately brought him into her car with the air conditioner blasting, where he sat on her lap, licked her face and wouldn’t move from her company,” the ASPCA spokesperson added.

Officer Aruna Maharaj, one of the NYPD rescuers, holds Snow, who was removed from a hot car in June. Maharaj has since adopted Snow.

Officer Aruna Maharaj, one of the NYPD rescuers, holds Snow, who was removed from a hot car in June. Maharaj has since adopted Snow. (ASPCA)

The ASPCA official said the dog’s adoption was delayed for several weeks because Snow needed to receive medical care and behavioral care. 

Officer Maharaj officially adopted Snow once the dog was cleared.

She brought him to her home, where he now enjoys a large backyard and walks to a nearby park, according to an emailed statement from the ASPCA.

Snow is enjoying a large backyard and regular walks to a nearby park.

The official also said Snow has been adjusting well to his new family and to having a cat sibling. 

This pup rescued by officers with the NYPD is now enjoying himself again.

This pup rescued by officers with the NYPD is now enjoying himself again. (ASPCA)

Fox News Digital reached out to the NYPD, who said the officer was not available for comment; the department did not comment on the case. 

As the summer continues, the ASPCA shared the following tips and advice for everyone when dealing with pets and the heat. 

A car can overheat even when the window has been left cracked an inch or two.

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The temperature inside a parked car may be as much as 20 degrees hotter than the temperature outside. 

Not only can it lead to a fatal heat stroke — it is also illegal in many states.

The signs that an animal is overheated include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, bright red gums, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor — or even collapse. 

Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomiting, along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. 

Heat stroke can be life-threatening.

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It can cause permanent damage or death.

Let your dog pant out excessive heat in a controlled and cooler space, such as an air-conditioned room, the ASPCA advises.

Also, when walking dogs in hot weather, never let them linger on hot asphalt — which can burn their sensitive paw pads. 

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Since pets are close to the ground, the hot asphalt can also contribute to their body heating up very quickly.