Thousands of New Yorkers fill the streets to watch Manhattanhenge

Thousands of New Yorkers fill the streets to watch the setting sun glow like a huge ball of fire between the city’s skyscrapers during Manhattanhenge

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Thousands of New Yorkers took to the streets of the city to watch the famous astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge on Sunday evening.

The natural phenomenon occurs when the sun lines up with the Manhattan street grid before setting and the city gets bathed in a radiant glow of light.

The term ‘Manhattanhenge’ was popularized by noted astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. It’s the city’s version of Stonehenge, where the sun aligns with prehistoric stones.

New Yorkers and tourists gathered in the middle of the streets with their phones in the air taking pictures of the stunning sight at 8.13pm.

The natural phenomenon occurs when the sun lines up with the Manhattan street grid before setting and the city gets bathed in a radiant glow of light

The natural phenomenon occurs when the sun lines up with the Manhattan street grid before setting and the city gets bathed in a radiant glow of light

A bird is seen flying across the sunset during the astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge on Sunday evening

A bird is seen flying across the sunset during the astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge on Sunday evening

Sailors gathered in the city for Fleet Week are seen taking in the astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge on Sunday evening

Sailors gathered in the city for Fleet Week are seen taking in the astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge on Sunday evening

New Yorkers are seen taking photos of Manhattanhenge while standing on 42nd Street in Times Square

New Yorkers are seen taking photos of Manhattanhenge while standing on 42nd Street in Times Square

People are seen in Times Square with their phones raised in the air taking photos of the stunning sight

People are seen in Times Square with their phones raised in the air taking photos of the stunning sight

A woman sits on a man's shoulders in the middle of the road in Times Square taking a picture of the famous astronomical event

A woman sits on a man’s shoulders in the middle of the road in Times Square taking a picture of the famous astronomical event

Two people make a heart with their hands and take a selfie as they watch the sun set in Manhattan on Sunday

Two people make a heart with their hands and take a selfie as they watch the sun set in Manhattan on Sunday

The term 'Manhattanhenge' was popularized by noted astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. It's the city's version of Stonehenge, where the sun aligns with prehistoric stones

The term ‘Manhattanhenge’ was popularized by noted astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. It’s the city’s version of Stonehenge, where the sun aligns with prehistoric stones

People gather on 42nd Street to watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square on Sunday night

People gather on 42nd Street to watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square on Sunday night

People in a passing yellow cab and on the street watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square

People in a passing yellow cab and on the street watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square

The astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge bathes the city in a warm red glow

The astronomical event known as Manhattanhenge bathes the city in a warm red glow

Sailors in the city for Fleet Week – which has returned after the pandemic – were also seen watching the natural phenomenon. 

Manhattanhenge happens four times a year: two days in May and and two days in July. 

NYC Parks lists the following streets as the best places to view the event thanks to the unobstructed views of the horizon: 57th Street, 42nd Street, 34th Street, 23rd Street, 14th Street, Tudor City Overpass, Manhattan, and Hunter’s Point South Park in Long Island City, Queens.

Jackie Faherty, senior scientist and astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History, told The New York Times: ‘It’s so famous because it’s a gorgeous sunset. The sun kisses the grid of one of the greatest cities, if not the greatest city in the world, and touches the whole corridor of the concrete jungle with these amazing golden hues. It’s a beautiful thing.’

Anyone who missed it, can also watch Manhattanhenge on Monday at 8.12pm or on July 11 and 12.

People gather on 42nd Street to watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square on Sunday

People gather on 42nd Street to watch the sun set during Manhattanhenge in Times Square on Sunday

Manhattanhenge happens four times a year: two days in May and and two days in July. Anyone who missed it on Sunday can also watch it on Monday

Manhattanhenge happens four times a year: two days in May and and two days in July. Anyone who missed it on Sunday can also watch it on Monday

The city is seen bathed in a warm glow as the sun sets in the city on Sunday night

The city is seen bathed in a warm glow as the sun sets in the city on Sunday night 

New Yorkers and tourists gathered in the middle of the streets with their phones in the air taking pictures of the stunning sight at 8.13pm

New Yorkers and tourists gathered in the middle of the streets with their phones in the air taking pictures of the stunning sight at 8.13pm 

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