Wrong! NASA publicly scolds Twitter critic who falsely claimed Neil Armstrong had to turn off female Medal of Freedom winner’s software to land on the moon

One Twitter user has learned that when you try and mess with NASA, you’re gonna get burned.

NASA immediately came to the defense of engineer Margaret Hamilton when one critic questioned the success of the software she wrote, which was used during the historical moon landing 47 years ago.

The space agency was celebrating the fact that Hamilton would receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom this week in a tweet when the critic spoke out.

NASA has defended Margaret Hamilton, who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom , when one Twitter critic questioned her contributions to the moon landing 50 years ago

NASA has defended Margaret Hamilton, who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom , when one Twitter critic questioned her contributions to the moon landing 50 years ago

Hamilton designed the software that was used by Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in 1969. The Twitter critic claimed the astronauts had turned it off before the successful mission

 

NASA quickly slapped down the critic's claims, explaining in a tribute on their website that the mission may have been aborted without Hamilton's contribution to the system

NASA quickly slapped down the critic’s claims, explaining in a tribute on their website that the mission may have been aborted without Hamilton’s contribution to the system

‘Congratulations to Margaret Hamilton. Will be honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom tomorrow for writing Apollo guidance software,’ NASA first tweeted. 

‘Is that the software Neil Armstrong deactivated to make the first moon landing? Just asking,’ the detractor asked. 

‘No – it is the software that made it possible for Armstrong and Aldrin to land on the Moon despite human errors. Just saying,’ NASA threw back. 

The exchange received public attention when it was retweeted by Andrés Almeida, a project manager and social media editor for NASA History. 

‘Shoutout to my boss for telling feeble misogynists what’s up,’ Almeida wrote in the caption, with the two tweets attached. 

But NASA didn’t only defend Hamilton, now 80, on Twitter. 

The exchange received public attention when it was retweeted by Andrés Almeida, a project manager and social media editor for NASA History

The exchange received public attention when it was retweeted by Andrés Almeida, a project manager and social media editor for NASA History

Hamilton spearheaded the team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which NASA had asked to develop the navigation system for the Apollo spacecraft in the 1960s 

Hamilton spearheaded the team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which NASA had asked to develop the navigation system for the Apollo spacecraft in the 1960s 

Hamilton wrote the code that allowed the system to prioritize certain commands when it became overloaded, which is exactly what happened three minutes before the moon landing
An alarm rang out as the computer became overburdened - but because Hamilton and her crew had already designed the system to focus on the most important tasks first, the astronauts didn't have to abort their mission

Hamilton wrote the code that allowed the system to prioritize certain commands when it became overloaded, which is exactly what happened three minutes before the moon landing

NASA also wrote a lengthy tribute to Hamilton on its official site, detailing how crucial her software was to Apollo 11’s successful moon landing in 1969.

Hamilton spearheaded the team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which NASA had asked to develop the navigation system for the Apollo spacecraft in the 1960s. 

It was Hamilton who wrote the code that allowed the system to prioritize certain commands when it became overloaded, according to the Boston Globe

That became crucial when, just three minutes before Apollo 11 was set to land on the moon, an alarm rang out as the computer became overburdened.

But because Hamilton and her crew had already designed the system to focus on the most important tasks first, the astronauts didn’t have to abort their mission over a noncritical issue.

‘Our astronauts didn’t have much time, but thankfully they had Margaret Hamilton,’ Obama said as he presented her with the Presidential Medal on Tuesday. 

‘Margaret led the team that created the on-board flight software that allowed the Eagle to land safely.’ 

What happened next, of course, made history. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took ‘one giant leap for mankind’ as they took their first steps on the moon.

'Our astronauts didn't have much time, but thankfully they had Margaret Hamilton,' Obama said as he presented her with the Presidential Medal on Tuesday

‘Our astronauts didn’t have much time, but thankfully they had Margaret Hamilton,’ Obama said as he presented her with the Presidential Medal on Tuesday

The president called Hamilton (pictured here with Tom Hanks) a symbol of the 'generation of unsung women who helped send humankind into space'

The president called Hamilton (pictured here with Tom Hanks) a symbol of the ‘generation of unsung women who helped send humankind into space’

Hamilton’s name didn’t make the headlines, but Obama made sure to give her the recognition she deserved on Tuesday.

The president said she was a symbol of the ‘generation of unsung women who helped send humankind into space’ as he awarded her the country’s highest civilian honor. 

‘Her software architecture echoes in countless technologies today,’ he said.  

Hamilton and her team would write the code for the world’s first computer and she then went on to head the Software Engineering Division at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory before starting her own software businesses.  

Hamilton would go on to head the Software Engineering Division at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory before starting her own software business.  

As her award notes, Hamilton is credited with helping lay the foundation for software design and engineering and, Obama said, remains an inspiration today.

‘Her example speaks of the American spirit of discovery that exists in every little girl and little boy,’ the president said. 

‘Who know that somehow to look beyond the heavens is to look deep within ourselves and to figure out just what is possible.’